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Founded in 1915, the Rotary Club of Tulsa has always been about service to others, both locally and internationally.

As Tulsa’s largest community service club and one of the largest out of over 33,000 Rotary Clubs around the world, we have evolved as a leader in bringing parties together and spearheading projects that help mankind.

tulsa-boys-home-first-locationTwo years after the club started in our new city and state, living conditions in Tulsa for some were hard. When a Rotarian came across a homeless orphan boy living in a discarded crate in a downtown alley, wheels were set in motion for our first major community project. That year, Tulsa Boys’ Home was formed.

When Tulsans recognized the lack of quality medical care for its youngest citizens, the Rotary Club of Tulsa founded Childrens’ Medical Center.

Rotarians organized Tulsa’s first Big Brother-style organization, and along with other community leaders, helped form the forerunner of today’s Tulsa Area United Way.

During war years, Tulsa’s largest service club organized blood drives and bond sales. We outfitted ambulances and provided them to the war effort, and then later to other Rotary Clubs for use in third world countries.

In 2000, we spearheaded an annual water well drilling program in Nicaragua. Working with a partner Rotary Club in Léon, each year Tulsa Rotarians travel to help bring fresh, drinkable water to the poorest parts of that Central American nation. With the support of individuals, The Rotary Foundation and other Rotary Clubs, we have successfully drilled more than 300 wells in villages, and at schools and hospitals, which has dramatically improved the lives of these Nicaraguans.

The Rotary Club of Tulsa founded the Medical Supplies Network, Inc., now a Rotary District 6110 project.  Monthly, MSNI ships container loads of no-longer-needed medical equipment from regional hospitals and clinics to medical facilities in impoverished nations.

From its beginning, Tulsa’s Up With Trees organization has counted on the Rotary Club of Tulsa – along with the 14 area Rotary Clubs – as a strategic and faithful partner.  You’ll find Rotary plantings all over Tulsa, and volunteer Rotarians helping maintain them.

Centennial Book Cover Art

Tulsa Centennial Book – Celebrate! 100 Years of Rotary in Tulsa

For our Oklahoma Centennial Project, Rotary – with the benevolence of generous Tulsans – purchased and preserved the mammoth Beryl Ford Collection of historical Tulsa pictures and artifacts. The public can now access the thousands of photos through TulsaLibrary.org.

Through our local charitable foundation, Rotary Club of Tulsa Foundation (formerly Tulsa Rotary Community Fund), Rotary has provided more than $1 million in grants to area charities. The fund is supported by the generosity of Rotarians and with proceeds from the club’s signature event, the Henry P. Iba Citizen Athlete Awards.

Founded in 1999, the club’s annual Crescendo Music Awards bring to Tulsa outstanding musicians from prestigious colleges and conservatories to compete for prize money.  It is recognized as one of the top five competitions for students in the country.

In 1976, the club launched Camp Enterprise, an annual three-day camp for high school juniors, where lessons of free enterprise combine with fun, outdoor activities and team-building. This has been one of the nation’s most successful, longstanding weekend camps where students learn the basics of building a business.

Week after week since 1915, the Rotary Club of Tulsa has provided outstanding weekly programs of interest and entertainment. Nationally recognized speakers, politicians, authors, educators, entertainers and business leaders have sought the podium before our audience of influential and successful community leaders.

As the club approaches its centennial in 2015, a significant project of public art was a gift for the people of Tulsa. Rotary Plaza features five bronze sculptures representing Tulsa’s volunteer spirit and the role Rotary has played in the development of Tulsa and support of Rotary projects around the world. Designed by noted artists Jay O’Meilia and David Nunneley, the sculptures are a gathering place for noontime workers and enjoyed by tourists who visit our beautiful city.

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Monday morning, be sure to tune in at 9:00 am to see President Mike Homan and Rotarian Stephanie Vickers Cameron on Good Day Tulsa on channel 8 as they discuss the value of membership and what the future holds for the Rotary Club of Tulsa. ... See MoreSee Less

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Have you met Robert Babcock?

Robert Babcock has a passion for inclusion. “Everyone has a place at life’s table” and he works hard to make sure each person’s contribution is valued, respected and purposeful.

“In this diverse world of ours, it is important to recognize and value our differences and maintain balance. Then we can create a world of synergy which fuels our greatest potential through inclusion,” he said.

Robert is Director of Community Relations for ONE Gas, a natural gas distribution company headquartered in Tulsa. ONE Gas is the parent company of Oklahoma’s largest natural gas utility, Oklahoma Natural Gas, which has been in operation since 1906 serving families and businesses in our great state.

Before he assumed this role, Robert was in the Human Resources Department at ONE Gas, and was responsible for leading Inclusion and Diversity initiatives. Prior to that he created and implemented the “Live Smart” health and wellness initiative at ONEOK.

A graduate of the University of Arkansas with a BA in Geography, he spends time training for marathons and is actively involved in the renaissance of Tulsa and Oklahoma City.
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Next year, Oklahoma's archaic liquor laws will change with the sale of wine in grocery stores; strong, cold beer in liquor stores and on-premises sales of Oklahoma-brewed craft beer. This Wednesday at Downtown Rotary, a panel of distinguished industry leaders will talk about how the new laws are impacting their part of the business and how the average Oklahoman will see changes in the way they purchase alcohol. Come hear Mike Thornbrugh with QuikTrip, Tina Parkhill with Parkhill's Warehouse Liquors and Wines, and Eric Marshall with Marshall Brewing Company share their perspectives. ... See MoreSee Less

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Tulsa’s downtown rebirth was already underway, but when developer Stuart Price and Price Family Properties acquired 13 properties from San Francisco philanthropist Maurice Kanbar earlier this year, that renaissance received a solid shot in the arm. At Wednesday's Club Meeting, Stuart will share his vision for downtown Tulsa and how attracting young professionals will match the growth and vitality of his expanded real estate portfolio. ... See MoreSee Less

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Upcoming Meetings